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Mastering Content Acquisition for Your FAST Channel: A Guide for Media Entrepreneurs

Content is king in the dynamic world of Free Ad-Supported Streaming (FAST) TV - your channel's success hinges on content quality, relevance, and diversity.


Here, we delve into some quick strategies and insider tips for acquiring compelling content that captivates your audience and distinguishes your channel in the competitive streaming landscape.



Understand Your Audience

Before diving into acquisitions, identify your channel’s positioning and your targeted audience's preferences and interests. Analyze viewing data, conduct surveys or focus groups, and engage in social listening to customize your content strategy.


This insight will guide you in selecting genres, shows, and schedules that resonate with your audience, viewing behavior and lifestyle, to help ensure a loyal and engaged viewership.


Budget Wisely

Set a realistic budget for content acquisition, this should always align with your expected revenue streams and audience growth. Remember relevant programming over quantity. Not all content needs to be top tier fresh from the box office, viewers appreciate carefully curated, interesting programming that aligns with their own viewing preferences.


Source Content Effectively

Identify potential content sources, including independent filmmakers, content syndication networks, and international distributors. Attend industry trade shows like MIPCOM, MIPTV, May Screening, or/and the American Film Market to discover new content and network with content providers. And of course there are online platforms that offer diverse content libraries that can be accessible from anywhere


Navigate Licensing Agreements

Licensing negotiations can make or break your content strategy and can be a very protracted process if not done correctly. Aim for clarity and fairness in agreements. Specifying exclusivity, license period, and territorial coverage is crucial to your licensing negotiations. And when starting out always consider that non-exclusive rights can often be the MOST cost-effective approach for a burgeoning FAST channel.



See Right Management as Key to Compliance

Understand the specific rights you're acquiring. Are you acquiring for global, regional, or a particular location? Are your rights exclusive or non-exclusive? Any missteps in rights management can lead to legal challenges and damage your channel's reputation.


Explore Partnership Opportunities

If original content is out of reach, consider a partnership. While not exclusive, partnerships with content suppliers can provide your audience with popular shows or movies at a fraction of the cost. Partnerships with content creators can also yield mutually beneficial content-sharing arrangements.



Leverage User-Generated Content (UGC)

For a more budget-friendly option, explore UGC. It's a goldmine for fresh and diverse content. Ensure you have explicit permissions and licenses to use such content, and always prioritize quality and relevance. However, make sure you are getting quality UGC too, every piece of UGC must be checked, graded, and approved by your programming team.


Stay Compliant

Adhere to broadcasting regulations and standards. This diligence ensures your content does not break any country’s policies, particularly in some countries with very tough rules due to strict cultural restrictions.


Measure Success

Finally, continuously monitor the performance of your content. Use analytics to review what works to re-evaluate your acquisition policies accordingly. Viewer preferences can shift rapidly, and your channel needs to stay agile and responsive.



As a media entrepreneur in the FAST channel, your content acquisition strategy is pivotal to your success. By understanding your audience, budgeting wisely, sourcing strategically, and staying compliant, you position your channel for growth and profitability. Embrace these strategies, and you'll survive the competitive landscape of streaming media and thrive in it.


If all that sounds like a lot of work - there’s an easier way: leveraging Content As A Service (CAAS) from allrites.





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